High Strangeness: A Ton of UFO Debris!

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

A Ton of UFO Debris!

This is why things never change. This is why UFO research never goes anywhere.

I was at a bookstore over the weekend and spotted a great looking book titled "Aliens," by Ron Miller (Watkins Media Limited, 2017). The book is a huge, beautifully-illustrated history of the human race's fascination with alien beings from other planets, and I immediately wanted to buy it.

But then, as I always do when I find a new UFO book, I flipped to the back and looked at the index to see if Dr. J. Allen Hynek was mentioned in the book. He was. Miller wrote that Dr. Hynek was a proponent of the "Extraterrestrial Hypothesis" (ETH), which is absolutely not true. Hynek considered it a possibility that UFOs had an extraterrestrial origin, but he didn't consider it likely. In fact, ETH was only one of many possible hypotheses that Hynek considered possible, but the important point is that Dr. Hynek did not favor any one of these possibilities over any of the others. Ten minutes of research would have shown Miller that Dr. Hynek was never a proponent of ETH.

I put the book back on the shelf.

Then today I read the news on the Coast to Coast AM newsletter that about 200 attendees at last week's "Roswell Fest" in Roswell, NM were given the chance to visit the alleged Roswell "crash site." This, of course, is the barren stretch of ranch land where a flying saucer was alleged to have crashed in early July, 1947. Up until now, only alleged "UFO researchers" have been given access to the site where rancher Mac Brazel claimed to have discovered some debris that he couldn't identify. He put some of the alleged debris in the back of his truck and took it to the sheriff, and you probably know how things went from there...

The C2C story had a link to a local New Mexico TV news report, and it's here that things really go off the rails. First, the reporter immediately claims that she is at the "UFO crash site," forgetting to add the modifier "alleged," which I have done above. Then she states, "...a man by the name of Mac Brazel says that this is where he saw a UFO crash." 


That's a big LOL right there. Brazel never claimed to have seen a UFO crash. In fact, no one has ever claimed to have seen anything at all crash on that ranch, because no one ever saw anything in the sky above that ranch, because it's a remote stretch of Godforsaken dirt and rocks some 75 miles away from Roswell. Nobody saw anything in the sky above the ranch, ergo, nobody saw anything crash into the ranch.

The rest of the news report, which you can watch here, is just as ridiculous. After claiming that Mac Brazel saw a UFO crash, the reporter says that "they found a ton of unearthly debris." A ton? Really? And who are the "they" who found this "ton" of "unearthly" debris? And by what standard was it ever deemed "unearthly?" A little proof, please!

Throughout, the reporter and the Roswell tourists she interviews simply take it as a given that an alien spacecraft crashed on this random spot on the ranch in 1947. "It really did happen," says some guy from Toronto. "It's almost spiritual."

Yeah, "almost."

"You can see where the craft landed, and where the alien bodies were found," says another guy from Los Angeles who at least didn't travel as far to waste his $250 as the guy from Toronto.

Of course, all of this this begs the question, "Which alleged 'crash site' did these tourists visit?" According to no less an authority as MUFON, the Mutual UFO Network, there are said to be as many as eleven Roswell "crash sites." So, which one did these people see? I think they're entitled to at least a partial refund, if not an explanation. I mean, by my calculations, the promoters of this tour grossed around $50,000 on the event.

So, yea, these are the reasons UFO research never seems to go anywhere. These are the reasons I get discouraged. If you're going to be doing UFO research or UFO journalism, for God's sake get it right. It's not that hard to do.

And, please... decide how many alleged crash sites there really are.
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